Artists2artists Social Network

Brought to you by ArtDeadline.Com

"Mandala-wp-a-night-in-tunisia-or-side-of-building-compton"

Views: 46

Comment

You need to be a member of Artists2artists Social Network to add comments!

Join Artists2artists Social Network

Comment by Resident Curator on August 10, 2012 at 5:17pm

Curator’s Comment:  

 

While I’m uncertain as to the origins of the ambiguously repeated subject matter in many of these works, I’m hypnotized by the bilateral symmetry of color and form.  The light emanating from this blue-violet ground is particularly appealing in contrast to the web like brushy shape in the middle.  At the heart (dead center) of the piece, the wispy black lines are spidery- a fragile dark snowflake against the cool, light ground.  I also sense a subtle animation of the black tendrils, as the movement is fluid and organic. While the title references clouds, and I can identify their presence, I also see this piece as aqueous, as if looking at ripples on a watery surface.  Perhaps this illusion is due to the flat use of space and absence of a distinguishable horizon. I’m drawn to the piece entitled Night in Tunisia- or Side of Building-Compton as well.  Perhaps it’s the airy pinkness that softens some of the harder geometric and architectural forms.  The slight variations of incidental marks in the solid color fields add an interesting hand-drawn quality to the otherwise pristine piece.  I find this distinction, or inclusion of disparate elements enlivens their visual juxtaposition.

Resident Curator Views

Ms Kristen T. Woodward critiques of members art.

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

2020 All Rights Reserved

2017-2020 All Rights Reserved - All images, information, text, and html found within this site and on individual artist pages, may not be copied, reproduced, modified, or distributed without prior written consent of content owner.

______________________

Member Terms of Service

© 2020   Created by A2a Editor.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service